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Posted: Jun 28, 2006 12:38

JULY 2006

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DAY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT ON RISE
(July 6, 2005) In a Wall Street Journal article published in the Post Gazette, the National Association of Independent Schools reported that over the past 10 years, boarding-school enrollment rose only 2.7 percent, versus 15 percent for private day schools. More...

RAVIV METHOD HELPS DYSLEXIA?
(March 29, 2006) The Telegraph UK reported Nili Raviv, founder of the Raviv learning method, says her program of repetitive exercises of breathing and relaxation techniques help children with dyslexia improve their reading, writing and concentration skills.

GIFTED, ADD, ADHD OR INDIGO?
(May 2006) Ezine published an article by Dorothy M. Neddermeyer, PhD, that points out how the characteristics and behaviors of Indigo children are strikingly similar to the National Foundation for Gifted and Creative Children's definition of gifted/ exceptional children. Also, recent studies indicate a significant correlation between children diagnosed as ADD or ADHD and those who have the characteristics of gifted/ exceptional children.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC USE RISING AMONG KIDS
(May 2, 2006) Medco Health Solutions, Inc., a leading pharmacy benefit manager, reported antipsychotic medicines for children under 20 increased 73% from 2001 to 2005, a much faster increase than among other groups. More...

GIRLS EARN TOP ACHIEVEMENTS
(May 3, 2006) The Chicago Sun Times reported that in the race for admission into one of the eight college prep high schools in Chicago, girls are beating boys by nearly 70 percent to 30 percent. The article also discussed the possibility of "gender weighting," to provide boys with lower test scores a greater possibility of being accepted into these high schools.

MALE/ FEMALE BRAINS WIRED DIFFERENTLY
(May 10, 2006) The Denver Post reported that Michael Gurian, an expert on gender brain differences who heads the Gurian Institute in Spokane, WA, says women trust feelings; men trust logic. He said, "A women's brain takes in more sensory data than a man's because they are biologically wired to see, hear, smell and feel more."

BRAT BULLYING ON RISE
(May 12, 2006) A UK essay considers why children from nice homes participate in non-physical bullying (brat bullying), especially among girls. More...

UK PRIVATE SCHOOLS GROWING
(May 12, 2006) BBC News reported that an increase in the recruitment of overseas pupils is a factor in the growth of private boarding schools. The increase in new entrants from overseas was 11 percent or 870 pupils, which alone accounts for the lion's share of the overall increase in all pupils (1,311).

STATE REMOVES CHILDREN FROM STAR RANCH
(May 13, 2006) The Kerriville Daily Times reported the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services canceled its contract with Star Ranch, outside San Antonio, TX, and removed 19 children from the residential facility. According to the story, the state cited one student's death in December 2005 and the near drowning of another student in May 2006, as cause for canceling the contract.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS TRY SINGLE SEX CLASSES
(May 15, 2006) The Star Tribune reported the National Association for Single Sex Public Education reports at least 209 public schools in the US offer separate-gender classes. Some advocates say such experiments could help close a gap in male/female academic performance. More...

TOP 10 PARENTING PITFALLS
(May 15, 2006) Experts provide tips and advice on 10 common scenes parents have with children. They explain how reactions will encourage either brat behavior or angel behavior. More...

CONGRESSMAN CALLS FOR REGS ON MYSPACE.COM
(May 16, 2006) eSchool News Online reported that Rep. Michael G. Fitzpatrick, R-PA, introduced a bill called Deleting Online Predators Act of 2006, or DOPA. DOPA would keep online predators from contacting children through social networking websites such as MySpace.com and require persons to be 18 or older to participate on such websites.

ONLINE DEGREE PROGRAMS TAKE OFF
(May 16, 2006) The Washington Post reported a study, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, that showed 65 percent of universities offering face-to-face graduate courses also offer graduate courses online. By early 2008, Eduventures, a Boston firm that studies trends in education, predicts about one in 10 college students will enroll in an online degree program.

ANAD OPPOSES PRO-EATING DISORDER WEBSITES
(May 16, 2006) NBC5.com reported organizations fighting eating disorders are battling to kick pro-eating disorder sites off the Web. The National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) searches for these websites daily and ask the web hosts to shut them down. Although many resist, citing freedom of speech, some such as Yahoo have banned these sites.

FOUR-DAY SCHOOL INCREASINGLY POPULAR
(May 18, 2006) CNN.com reported the number of states sanctioning districts with four-day school weeks has at least doubled since a survey by the National School Boards Association in 2003 showed nine states and roughly a hundred districts adopting the measure.

FAT FEAR SURVEY
(May 18, 2006) FoxNews.com reported an online survey by Marlene B. Schwartz, PhD, associate director of Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, and her colleagues, found a surprising number of people would make significant sacrifices rather than be obese.

TEEN CAREER COUNSELING ON RISE
(May 18, 2006) The Shreveport Times reported fee-based career counseling for teens isn't yet booming like the growing industry linked to the admissions frenzy at top colleges. Some parents pay thousands of dollars to tutors and counselors to try to get them in the door, but there appears to be increasing evidence it is a growing business.

THE HUMAN BEHIND THE REALITY SHOW
(May 18, 2006) The Daily Mail reported an opinion article by a contestant on the Big Brother Reality Show. She revealed how the show resulted in nothing but cruel words, vicious criticism and heartache, feelings that eventually led to attempted suicide.

PROGRAM FOR COURT PLACED KIDS A SUCCESS
(May 19, 2006) The Blairsville Dispatch reported the Outside In School, a residential school for juvenile delinquent boys, offers second chances for teenage boys to learn to recognize their mistakes and become valuable members of society.

UK GIRLS OUTPACE BOYS ON BAD BEHAVIOR
(May 20, 2006) WorldNetDaily reported a survey in Britain shows that teenage girls are more likely to drink, smoke, steal and take drugs than teenage boys.

PARENTS BULLY EACH OTHER
(May 20, 2006) The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported Milwaukee schools have witnessed a large quantity of violent episodes among adults, particularly parents, causing violent disruptions. Pete Pochowski, director of security for the schools, noted that in the first seven weeks of the school year, there were reports of 16 outsiders causing disruptions in the schools. More...

LEARNING COMMUNITIES SUCCEED
(May 20, 2006) The Los Angeles Times reported First Things First, a reform program instituted in Kansas City Schools, has students working industriously in small "communities" with the same teachers throughout their high school years. Attendance, achievement test scores and the graduation rate has climbed steadily.

VIDEOGAME BASED ON COLUMBINE SHOOTINGS
(May 20, 2006) The Washington Post reported Danny Ledonne, 24, the game's designer, said he made the game partly as an "indictment of our society at large. I'm not advocating shooting up your school. This game does not glorify school shootings."

TEEN OBESITY HIGHER AMONG POOR
(May 23, 2006) Newsday.com reported a study conducted by Johns Hopkins' sociologist Richard Miech, the study's lead author, found the percentage of overweight adolescents' age 15-17, is about 50 percent higher in poor families than non-poor families.

DEBATE OVER DROPOUT DATA
(May 23, 2006) The Washington Post reported Larry Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, found research that indicated only about 12 percent of the workforce lacked a high school diploma or GED. This is in opposition to data used by politicians that cites a 30 percent dropout rate nationwide.

NY SCHOOL VIOLENCE UNDERREPORTED
(May 23, 2006) The New York Times reported New York School officials have significantly underreported violent behavior to the state, found Alan G. Hevesi, state comptroller, in an audit. Hevesi faulted the State Education Department as well as the schools, saying the department "ignored the problem" until the audit began.

DRUG HELPS BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER
(May 26, 2006) Reuters Health reported on a study that concluded the anti-psychotic drug Abilify (aripiprazole) appears to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder. According to the report, Abilify often leads to improvements in health-related quality of life and interpersonal problems.

LONG-LASTING EFFECTS OF EARLY DEPRIVATION
(May 29, 2006) A team of US and UK researchers conducted a study that found "Severe malnourishment and other forms of deprivation for sustained periods during a child's early years may have lasting consequences on his or her intellectual development in later childhood." More...

HAWAII SEEKS TO REDUCE DROPOUT RATE
(May 29, 2006) The Honolulu Advertiser, reported on statewide attempts to reduce dropout rates by developing alternative schools and learning communities, and by locating dropouts to advise them of education options.

FEWER KIDS DRINKING ALCOHOL BEFORE 13
(May 30, 2006) Fox News reported the results of studies regarding young people's drinking habits, which showed among other things, that despite serious concern, there are fewer children drinking alcohol before 13 than in previous years.

PSYCHOTHERAPY HARMFUL TO SOME
(May 30, 2006) Richard Friedman, MD explains in a New York Times article that from various studies and in his psychiatric practice, some 5-10 percent of patients do worse in psychotherapy because talking about their feelings can be toxic. More...

IS ADVERTISING DISEASE MONGERING?
(May 30, 2006) The Washington Post article discusses the concept that drug ads may sell people on the idea that they are sick.

STIMULANT DRUGS MOST EFFECTIVE FOR ADHD
(May 30, 2006) The United Press International reported a study released at the 2006 meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in Toronto, Canada, concluded that "Stimulants are better than non-stimulants or novel stimulants for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder."

MEN OFTEN VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE
(May 31, 2006) A 32-nation study of violence against dating partners among university students found that "about one-third are violent with their partner and women are as likely as men to be the perpetrator." More...

HIPPAA ENFORCEMENT LAX
(June 5, 2006) A Washington Post article reported that enforcement agencies responsible for compliance with the medical records privacy, as required by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPAA), are focusing on voluntary compliance and leveling few fines or serious consequences.

BIOFEEDBACK ENHANCES PERFORMANCE
(June 5, 2006) The American Psychological Association publication summarizes research that indicates biofeedback can help cure illness and boost performance for both healthy people and those with problems.

WEB INCREASING AS MEDIA CHOICE
(June 5, 2006) A recent research project at Ball State University's Center for Media Design found the Web is the dominant at-work media and No. 2 in the home. More...

COLLEGE STUDENTS INFLICTING SELF-INJURY
(June 5, 2006) The AP Medical Writer conducted a study of two Ivy League colleges, which found that 17 percent of the students attending those schools are self-abusing. The article pointed out that this is something that seems to be more and more common in colleges, high schools and middle schools. More...

HEALTH CARE CONFERENCE
(June 5, 2006) Therese Byrne, Foundation Associates, Nashville, TN, 877-345-3274, announced the Crossroads of Health Care, Finding Solutions to Critical Issues, conference in Baltimore, MD, on August 7-9, 2006. The conference will be held at the Wyndham Baltimore Inner Harbor Hotel in Baltimore, MD, with several keynote speakers on the agenda.

BATHROOM BREAKS FOR EXTRA CREDIT?
(June 6, 2006) The Washington Post reported that in an effort to increase student attention to their studies, some DC public schools have stooped to giving extra credit to students who don't take bathroom breaks. More...

EUROPE'S FIRST VIDEO GAMING DETOX CLINIC
(June 9, 2006) A group of addiction counselors opened a detox clinic to treat video game addictions. The claim is that video game addictions can cause withdrawal symptoms similar to alcohol and drug addiction. More...

CONCORD REVIEW FOSTERS SECONDARY ACADEMICS
(June 10, 2006) The Concord Review spotlights secondary students who produce outstanding academic work in history. The goal is "to recognize and publish exemplary history essays by high school students in the English-speaking world."

DEPRESSION DRUGS MAY UP DIABETES RISK
(June 12, 2006) Researchers from the Diabetes Prevention Program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, found that "Taking antidepressants seems to dramatically increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes." More...

NATIONAL SUMMIT ON SCHOOL DESIGN
(June 12, 2006) A report from the National Summit on School Design, issued by the American Architectural Foundation and KnowledgeWorks Foundation, concluded that construction of schools for the 21st century should be radically redesigned. The report said schools should be more integrated with their communities while accommodating diverse learning styles and uses of technology. More...

SSIR ANTIDEPRESSANTS REDUCE SUICIDES
(June 13, 2006) Julio Licino, MD, led a study while at UCLA, which found that from 1988 to 2002, as Prozac and other SSIR drugs became more popular; suicides dropped. More...

AT-RISK TEEN PROGRAM EXPANDS
(June 13, 2006) Minister Lorraine Yvonne Bogan, Chicago IL, 773-336-4924, announced the expansion of her National Violence Prevention Program that uses faith based principles. Her OverComers-SAFE Haven Ministries, started in south Chicago helping young people reduce violence and empowering them.

ROBERTS EXPLAINS CHAT ROOM LINGO
(June 13, 2006) Todd Roberts explained some basics on understanding text messaging and chat room abbreviations lingo in an Ezine Article. More...

NEW BOOK CRITIZES ED ESTABLISHMENT
(June 13. 2006) Author and educational consultant Richard G. Neal, asserts in his new book The Deserved Collapse of Public Schools, that the downward spiral of public schools is largely self-inflicted. More...

WHY DO TEENS HAVE SEX?
(June 14, 2006) A recent survey by Mary Ott, MD at Indiana University, and colleagues from the University of California, San Francisco, asked ninth graders in northern California why they would want to have sex. One thing that stood out was the desire for intimacy and social status, with boys and girls having a different emphasis in general. More...

METH EPIDEMIC EXAGGERATED
(June 14, 2006) An advocacy group called "The Sentencing Project" concluded a study indicating that Meth use is flat and declining among teens with it being primarily a localized problem. More...

MOSQUITOTONE ADAPTED BY TEENS
(June 14, 2006) eSchool News reported that security personnel in Wales used a high-pitched tone heard by teens, but not most adults, originally called Mosquitotone, to drive teens from the Mall. However, teens have now adapted it to signal them when text messages arriving while they are in class because teachers usually cannot hear it.

BOOK: BOYS TO MEN
(June 14, 2006) Author Paul Richardson wrote the book Boys to Men: A Guide for Raising Boys, based on his experience in guiding "one young man from the streets of Oklahoma City to becoming one of America's finest serving in the sands of Afghanistan and Iraq." More...

BOOK ON PARENTAL ALIENATION SYNDROME
(June 14, 2006) Author Pamela Richardson released a new book called A Kidnapped Mind, which describes how Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS) can alienate a child from the other parent causing tremendous psychological damage. More...

FLORIDA OPENS STAR PROGRAM
(June 19, 2006) WUSF 89.7 News reported that after the controversy over the beating death of a 14-year-old boy in a Panama City, FL boot camp, Governor Bush recently signed a bill doing away with the camps and has now replaced them with the Sheriff's Training and Respect Program (STAR).

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