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Posted: Aug 1, 2005 06:37

AUGUST 2005

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FACES CONFERENCE DATES
(May 2005) Richard Fields, PhD, Owner/Director, FACES Conferences & Home Study Programs, Redmond, WA, 877-633-2237, announced that the 6th Annual Conference on Adolescent Treatment is scheduled for October 26-29, 2005 in San Diego, CA, and the 7th Annual Las Vegas, NV, conference runs from November 9-12, 2005 with a focus on Emerging Issues of Trauma and Violence, Substance Abuse, Couples and Adolescents.

UK STUDY - BOYS PERFORM BETTER
(June 2005) Child Development Newswire reported the Raising Boys’ Achievement Project, a study commissioned by the Department for Education in the United Kingdom indicates that boys performed better in school when they attended classes comprising of one sex because they were better able to concentrate on their studies and showed noticeable gains in their grades. Part of the study’s goal is to change the opinion held by many boys that it is not cool to learn. More...

PRIVATE PLACEMENT 4X PUBLIC
(June 2005) A nation-wide survey of 86 Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare (OBH) programs suggested that private placement outnumbered adjudicated programs by almost five to one and more than 80 percent of all OBH programs are licensed by state agencies. Results showed that the OBH industry serves more than 11,000 clients per year with steady growth. The purpose of this study is to identify and survey OBH programs currently operating in the United States to rectify common misconceptions on poorly managed OBH programs. More...

GIRLS ACCUSED OF HAZING
(June 23, 2005) Koin News 6, in Portland, OR, reported three Lake Oswego seniors are under investigation for allegedly dangerous and out-of-control hazing of underclassmen. Police say the teenagers took six freshmen girls down a wooded trail for the hazing but no one was injured. Clackamas County juvenile authorities will decide whether to file criminal charges. More...

ABUSE ALLEGATION AT PROGRAM
(June 24, 2005) NewsChannel 5, in Nashville, TN, reported the Department of Children's Services (DCS) is ending its contract with Magnolia Academy's wilderness program, where they sent juveniles after committing minor crimes. DCS announced in a letter that the change is because of widespread allegations of child abuse by staff members at Magnolia. More...

STATES OVER-REPORT GRADUATION
(June 24, 2005) The Washington Post reported that according to data compiled by the US Department of Education, several states have reported higher-than-average graduation rates, some as high as 97 percent. A report released by the Education Trust, an education think tank, found many states provided "misleading" data and their claims were based on "extremely unreliable" data and "ludicrous definitions" of high school dropout rates. Unofficial estimates of graduation rates, based on analysis of school enrollment figures, suggest that 30 percent of incoming ninth-graders never graduate. States use a wide variety of methods to calculate graduation rates, making state-by-state comparisons virtually meaningless. More...

REFORM SCHOOL INVESTIGATED
(June 25, 2005) The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, PA, reported that state police and the Department of Public Welfare are investigating an incident at a Butler County reform school, Summit Academy, which allegedly left a West Virginia teen with more than 20 stitches in his face. More...

ARE YOUNG WORKERS SPOILED?
(June 26, 2005) The Pasadena Star News reported the latest generation of young workers has shockingly high expectations for salary, job flexibility and duties, but little willingness to take on grunt work or remain loyal to a company. "It seems they want and expect everything the 20-30 year veteran has, the first week they're there,” says Mike Amos, a Salt Lake City-based franchise consultant for Perkins Restaurants. More...

SCHOOLS: FOR CHILDREN OR ADULTS?
(June 26, 2005) The San Diego Union Tribune reported the conflict within the school system comes down to the competing interests of the adults who work in the school system with those of the students served by that system. Any issue that is creating friction or meeting resistance happens because it pits the interests of adults against those of children. Moreover, as the story points out, the adults run the show in the public school system. More...

LONGER COMMUTES TO SCHOOL
(June 27, 2005) The Los Angeles Times reported students’ making long trips to private and public school is nothing new and many families are not letting long commutes deter them from enrolling their children in schools they deem best. "This is one more variation on the growing movement for school choice," said Jennifer Jellison Holme, a researcher at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. More...

THREE STOOGES OR GOVERNMENT
(June 27, 2005) An article by John Fund in the Wall Street Journal: Opinion Journal, reported a survey by the National Constitution Center found that while only about four in 10 teens could name the three branches of the federal government six in 10 could name all Three Stooges. The direction of reform on teaching history is controversial. Ronald Regan said, "We've got to teach history based not on what's in fashion, but what's important. If we forget what we did, we won't know who we are. I am warning of an eradication of the American memory that could result, ultimately, in an erosion of the American spirit." More...

FEMALE PSYCHOLOGIST CHARGED
(June 29, 2005) The Associated Press reported Psychologist Shannon Elizabeth Yager, 36, of Bardstown, KY, plead not guilty on 12 counts of third-degree rape of a 15-year-old male client at a psychiatric facility for adolescents. She resigned from the facility in January 2004, but continued to help for another four months. The boy's father told police his son bragged about having sex with Yager while at the Spectrum Care Academy, where Yager worked the night shift. The documents report that the sexual relationship took place in 2003 and 2004. Both told investigators they were in love. More...

2005 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON AT-RISK YOUTH
(July 2005) Kara Farina, Director of Social Policy Center at The Performance Institute, 703-894-0920, announced the 2005 National Conference on At-Risk Youth to improve youth services and implement positive youth development is set for August 2-4, 2005 in Arlington, VA. Workshops include techniques to improve positive outcomes for at-risk youth, implementing effective youth development programs, and addressing the needs of youth at-risk for substance abuse, youth violence, teen suicide and school dropout. Exhibitors are encouraged to contact Tony Marinier at 703-894-0481.

BOYS AND READING CONFERENCE
(July 2005) Woodberry Forest School, Woodberry Forest, VA, announced they will host a two-day conference on the topic of “Boys and Reading” for high school and college-level teachers on October 9-10. Cost for the session is $100. For more information and online registration, Click Here or call Barbara May at 540-672-6048.

VIA3: SECURE VIDEO CONFERENCING
(July 2005) Giovana Nurena, VIACK Corporation Marketing Communications, 866-265-8060, announced VIA3 from VIACK is a secure form of video conferencing software that enables parents to play a vital role in the recovery of their teens. VIA3 gives families a means to communicate with their teens throughout the treatment program by providing them live interaction, such as “visiting sessions” and even therapeutic sessions. “Since we implemented VIA3 in June of last year, parents have shared more with their teens therapeutically than they’ve ever done before,” said Scott Jones, program manager of Turnabout Teens, a Utah-based treatment center for 12-17-year-olds.

RESEARCH: WHAT TEENS EAT
(July 2005) BuzzBack, New York, NY, 646-519-8010, revealed Market Research’s Annual 2005 Teen Health & Nutrition Survey, which showed US teens, ages 13-19, understand and appreciate the health and wellness benefits of food. The survey included a sample of over 500 teens nationally. Results offer readers insight on not only teen consumer meal, snacking and beverage consumption behavior and trends, but also what new types of foods teens want.

SCHOOLS CAN'T FORCE MEDS
(July 3, 2005) The Star Tribune reported schools no longer have the upper hand in deciding whether children should receive Ritalin or other controlled substances. A new federal law tilts that power to parents, barring states and schools from keeping students out of class in cases when parents disagree with a recommendation to medicate a child. The law is provoking an emotional debate over the proper role of teachers and other school employees in trying to help children they believe are troubled. More...

TV LINKED WITH POOR ACADEMICS
(July 5, 2005) The Boston Globe reported a study published in the July issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, found too much television watching can harm childrens' ability to learn, and may even reduce their chances of getting a college degree. One of the studies involved nearly 400 California third-graders. Those with televisions in their bedrooms scored about eight points lower on math and language arts tests than children without TV’s. According to an Archives editorial, these studies largely ignored other research that "found positive associations between children's educational television viewing and subsequent academic achievement.” More...

VIDEO-GAME CAMPS TARGET AT-RISK YOUTH
(July 7, 2005) eSchool News online reported a trio of electronic gaming enthusiasts is playing on kids' interest in video games to help at-risk urban youth learn key math and science concepts and possibly open doors into the lucrative game-design industry for them. "The Urban Video Game Academy (UVGA) has touched on the pulse-point of what is hot and relevant to kids today and is using that to inject them with a hunger for learning and a palate for things technical," said prospective UVGA instructor Angel Inokon. More...

OCEAN STUDY: SAILING ADVENTURE
(July 12, 2005) The SEA Education Association (SEA), 800-552-3633, announced they offer college students (or gap-year students) a semester that challenges them intellectually and physically by combining a study of the deep ocean with the sailing adventure of a lifetime. This 12-week program offers 17 credit hours through Boston University. The program still has a handful of openings for the fall semester with great cruise tracks.

TEXTBOOKS GIVE WAY TO INTERNET
(July 12, 2005) eSchool News online reported that in Tennessee, a private partnership formed by educators, a web designer, a lawmaker, and a history buff launched a website to help schools fill the gap in state history instruction. Nashville teachers were lacking the materials they needed to fulfill the history requirements. Writer Bill Carey created an idea for what might benefit the state's teachers and students, the Tennessee History for Kids website. His website is separated by grade level, with each level providing the information needed to meet state requirements. The site also includes separate sections for teachers and parents. More...

SEXUAL PREDATORS LISTED ON WEB
(July 12, 2005) An email notification from Rachel Atkinson, National Alert Registry (Politis Communications), DeLand, FL, 801-523-3730, announced that parents and individuals can obtain a “Predator Report” on sex offenders by visiting the website. This site requires a fee for obtaining these lists.

COUNSELORS INDICTED FOR MURDER
(July 21, 2005) The White County News Telegraph, Cleveland, GA, reported that six camp counselors at the state-run Appalachian Wilderness Camp in Cleveland, were indicted on felony murder charges in the death of a 13-year-old boy who was allegedly restrained for over an hour on April 20, 2005. More...

WHITMORE FACES NEW CHARGES
(July 22, 2005) The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake, UT, reported that even as Whitmore Academy, Nephi, UT, owner Cheryl Sudweeks contests charges of child abuse, state officials are investigating new abuse allegations at the Juab County boarding school. More...

MISSING CHILDREN DISPLAYED ON KIOSK
(July 2005) Media PR Group announced that SurferQuest, a supplier of public Internet kiosk systems, has collaborated with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) to introduce photos of missing children into the SurferQuest Kiosks. The missing child photos will rotate on the monitors capturing the attention of the passing audience. The pay-per-use system will allow free access to those reporting a sighting and an opportunity to learn more details about a particular missing child. For more information about NCMEC, call 703-837-6111 or 24-hour hotline at 800-THE-LOST.

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