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Posted: Jul 2, 2004 10:49

JULY 2004

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HALLOWELL ADDS AD/HD INDICATOR TOOL
(March 16, 2004) The Hallowell Center, Sudbury, MA, 978-287-0810, www.drhallowell.com, has added The DataLex™ AD/HD Indicator Report™ from Lexicor, which uses "patient brain wave data collected from non-invasive, quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG)" to identify those with AD/HD (Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity). Dr. Hallowell writes in his forthcoming book Delivered From Distraction "About two-thirds of the cases of ADD that are diagnosed in this country are diagnosed not by specialists … but by PCP's, including pediatricians, family physicians, internists and other non-specialists. The qEEG could improve the diagnostic reliability of their necessarily hurried evaluations (and) could drastically reduce the chance for misdiagnosis…."

FIVE STUDENTS TREATED FOR MEDICATION ABUSE
(May 14, 2004) The Washington Post, www.washingtonpost.com reported five Loudoun County ninth-graders were sent to the hospital after taking a combination of Dramamine and a cold medication, part of what experts say is an alarming trend in drug use. The medications, available without prescription, are used in high doses as recreational drugs. In large doses, each can produce a drunken feeling and hallucinations, as well as dry mouth, an elevated heart rate, drowsiness and confusion. Large doses of either can be dangerous and more so when combined.

PARENTS SPEND MORE ON BEHAVIOR DRUGS THAN ANTIBIOTICS
(May 17, 2004) An Associated Press story on the St. Petersburg Times reported, www.sptimes.com disorder drugs has risen 49 percent for children under five; new figures show spending on those drugs has for the first time edged past what parents are spending on antibiotics and asthma medications. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the number of children three to 17 diagnosed with a behavioral disorder rose from 3.3-million in 1997 to 4.4-million in 2002.

REPORT CITES HOSPITAL CHAOS
(May 19, 2004) A Post-Standard article reported www.syracuse.com that during a visit to Four Winds psychiatric hospital in Syracuse, a federal inspector witnessed a nurse was laying on top of a young female patient while restraining her for more than five minutes on a hallway floor. The federal agency noted that conditions were an "immediate and serious threat" to patient's health and safety.

MISSISSIPPI BETHEL BOYS AND GIRLS ACADEMIES
(June 2004) A series of news reports focusing on some of the allegations against Bethel Girls Academy in Petal, MS, and concerns about the Bethel Boys Academy, resulted in calls for state licensing of private religious schools. Links can be found in Breaking News at www.strugglingteens.com.

RATE OF MENTAL ILLNESS IS 'STAGGERING'
(June 1, 2004) WebMD reported my.webmd.com on a World Health Organization study that showed the rates of most mental illness are far higher in the US than any other country in the world. A survey of more than 60,000 adults showed a 27 percent rate of mental disorders in the US population for a list of diseases, which was much higher than in the 13 other countries surveyed.

ANTIDEPRESSANTS SEEN AS EFFECTIVE FOR ADOLESCENTS
(June 2, 2004) An article posted on the New York Times website said, query.nytimes.com a study conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health, shows that Prozac helps teenagers overcome depression better than psychotherapy, and in combination, these two treatments produce the best results in reducing suicide risk. It is the first study to compare psychotherapy and drug treatment for adolescents.

'GOOGLE FOR SCHOLARS' UNDER DEVELOPMENT
(June 3, 2004) In a story on the eSchool News website, www.eschoolnews.com Google announced it is currently developing a free service CrossRef, which is specifically designed to make it easier for students and scholars to research scientific information. CrossRef will combine the Google search engine with up to 300 archived scholarly publications. [Free registration required]

LAWMAKER BACKS MEASURE FOR ANTI-BULLYING PROGRAMS
(June 4, 2004) An Associated Press story on the CentreDaily.com website reported, www.centredaily.com on a new anti-bullying program implemented by Valley Elementary School in Harrisburg, PA. Since the program started, the number of suspensions dropped from 30 to 17 during the 2002-03 school year. Michelle McDonough, a Bensalem parent said, "The kids aren't afraid to talk anymore ... if there's a problem, they think almost anything can be fixed."

BRAIN APPRECIATES EARNED REWARDS
(June 4, 2004) The WEEK magazine, pg. 21, reported that behavioral scientists at Emory University in Atlanta concluded that through the use of computer games, "our brains are hard-wired to enjoy rewards more when we earn them." Researcher Gregory Berns told Associated Press, "From the brain's perspective, earning it is more meaningful and probably more satisfying."

BOOT CAMP OPENS DOORS TO GIRLS
(June 6, 2004) The Brownsville Herald reported, www.brownsvilleherald.com that the Amador R. Rodriguez Juvenile Boot Camp and Educational Center in San Benito, CA has opened its doors to girls. The boot camp holds 72 boys and eight girls. Tommy Ramirez, CEO for Juvenile Justice System in Cameron County, said, "one of the focuses of the program is to build self-esteem. I don't think there are physical or psychological dangers here. We use tough love, a balance of discipline and structure. The biggest idea is to provide the tools for them to succeed in the free world."

EXAM FEARS DRIVING TEENAGERS TO PROZAC
(June 6, 2004) An Observer article posted on the Guardian Unlimited (United Kingdom) reported, education.guardian.co.uk that teenagers rely on drugs like Prozac to see them through stressful exams. In less then a decade, the number of anti-depressant prescriptions written for teens has dramatically increased from 46,000 to 140,000, according to a comparison between current statistics, and the1995 statistics from the MHRA, a government watchdog group.

SCHOOLS CHIEF TALKS CHEATING
(June 6, 2004) An article from Mercury News reported www.mercurynews.com cheating in school, in the boardroom and in society at large is a hot topic across the nation. National surveys of high school and college students have shown that cheating is prevalent and on the rise. The Mercury News wrote about a series of cheating incidents at Saratoga High School and how the school has responded. Colleen B. Wilcox, county superintendent of schools, discussed her views on cheating and what schools and parents can do to stop their children from cheating.

GIRLS OUT NUMBER BOYS AMONG VALEDICTORIANS
(June 6, 2004) A Boston Globe story reported www.boston.com that the majority of the top-ranked high school seniors for the last five years in Boston public schools were girls. In 2000 about 60 percent of Boston's 28 valedictorians were girls, and in 2004, with 53 percent of the senior class being female, that percentage rose to 80 percent. According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, while girls perform better in reading they rank slightly lower in math.

OBESITY: WHAT'S EATING OUR KIDS?
(June 7, 2004) In a press release, Mark Stubis, Vice President for Communications for KidsPeace, New York, NY announced www.expertclick.com, that childhood obesity is not only caused by what children are eating, but also from "What's Eating Our Kids." KidsPeace is part of a national campaign to fight childhood obesity by battling the "Underlying Emotional Causes of Obesity While Ensuring Good Physical Health & Eating Habits."

'TOXIC DUST' ON SCHOOL COMPUTERS LINKED TO DISEASE
(June 7, 2004) In an article from eSchool News online reported www.eschoolnews.com the dust found on many computer processors and monitors used in schools and other locations, contain chemicals linked to reproductive and neurological disorders, according to a new study by several environmental groups. Researchers say the results are not alarming enough to justify panic, but add that schools with high concentrations of young students and women of child-bearing age, should be aware of the problem and should require all future purchases of computers and other electronics to be toxin-free. They say this advice applies to all consumers.

INTERNET ADDRESSES INCREASE TO 62.9 MILLION
(June 8, 2004) A Washington Post story on a study conducted by VeriSign Inc. reported www.washingtonpost.com that there are now 62.9 million Internet URL addresses registered. This is accompanied by increasing records on the number of domain sales, with 4.7 million Internet addresses sold in the first three months of 2004, a 35 percent increase over the first three months of last year.

RESEARCH SHOWING TEACHER CERTIFICATION NOT VITAL
(June 9, 2004) The Mathematica Policy Research Inc., in Princeton, NJ, produced a study comparing Teach for America participants, few of whom had teaching credentials, with a comparable group who went through standard state certification processes. They found Teach for America teachers far outperformed those with standard certification in math, and both groups performed equally in reading. This suggests young dedicated teachers with no formal education training are at least as effective as those with formal education credentials. The full report can be found at www.mathematicampr.com

RISING CASES OF CHILD SEX OFFENDERS
(June 14, 2004) The Sun-Sentinel.com in southern Florida reported pqasb.pqarchiver.com an increase in sexual assaults among grade-schoolers. Child offenders are getting younger and their sexual knowledge is far more advanced. In 2001-02, the Department of Children and Families received 3,614 calls to its abuse hotline for child-on-child sexual incidents where the perpetrator was younger than 13. This disturbing trend creates a challenge for prosecutors, who can't try prepubescent children because they are considered legally incompetent to stand trial. [This story is now archived, a synopsis may be found with this link or readers may pay a fee for the complete story.]

FAS CONFERENCE
(June 15, 2004) Jim Stream and Eva Carner, 888-818-6298, www.arcriversideca.org, announced the Arc Riverside California Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Organization, in Arc, CA, is sponsoring a national conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum and related Neurobehavioral Disorders in Riverside, CA on October 28-29, 2004.

SAN MARCOS ADDS LD STAFF
(June 15, 2004) Victor H. Schmidt, President of San Marcos Baptist Academy, San Marcos, TX, 512-753-8008 announced that the school is adding Tom and Keri Rhodes to their staff to strengthen their learning skills program. The Rhodes have spent the last 21 years developing and operating the learning skills program at Wasatch Academy in Utah.

CHICAGO'S NEW REFORMS TO INCLUDE PRIVATE AND CHARTER SCHOOLS
(June 25, 2004) The Chicago Tribune reported, www.chicagotribune.com that after a decade attempting massive reforms, Chicago's public schools continue to fail and Mayor Richard Daley is proposing to shut them down and start from scratch with the wave of new reforms that will emphasize smaller independently operated schools. As the nation's third-largest school system, Daley's campaign is to lean heavily on the private sector for ideas, funding and day-to-day management of more than 100 reorganized schools.

A DESCRIPTION OF A TRANSPORT
(July 2004) Legal Affairs, headquartered in Connecticut (The magazine at the intersection of law and life) gives a lengthy description of the transport business by going with a transport agent on his trip to take a teen to a WWASP facility. www.legalaffairs.org




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